ELIZABETH A. BAKER INTERVIEW

In this interview with Florida-based New Renaissance Artist Elizabeth A. Baker we discuss Elizabeth’s early experiences with music, her formative years in the Florida punk and math-rock scene, learning through community and unpack what it means to be a New Renaissance Artist. In this interview with Elizabeth A. Baker we also discuss her recent work as artist in residence with the Price Hill Creative Community Festival – a truly one-of-a-kind music festival and experimentation cultivator in Cincinnati – curated by Marlo Salem – a past Podcast guest. Elizabeth A. Baker is truly a fascinating and exciting interview guest and cross-discipline artist. Check out her latest album Quadrivium linked below.

To submit to a label chosen by society for myself and my work and my practice is to submit to the myriad of expectations, which fall within the box of existent knowledge of a particular role. Whilst, I may present as a composer, musician, performing artist, sound artist, recordist, producer, dancer, author, builder, coder, and a whole host of other roles that are known and unknown — each role is but a single part of a working unit that is named Elizabeth A. Baker — by taking control of the naming of my artistic practice and my being, I am able to afford myself the space for constant reinvention and redefinition. I am a new renaissance artist.

Eschewing the collection of traditional titles that describe single elements of her body of work, Elizabeth refers to herself as a “New Renaissance Artist” that embraces a constant stream of change and rebirth in practice, which expands into a variety of media, chiefly an exploration of how sonic and spatial worlds can be manipulated to personify a variety of philosophies and principles both tangible as well as intangible. Elizabeth has received international recognition from press, scholars, and the public for her conceptual compositions and commitment to inclusive programming. Fanfare Magazine proclaimed in Fall 2019 “Perhaps Baker will be the Pauline Oliveros of her generation, and perhaps she will be more than that.”

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